ALBERTO PEPE

I am the co-founder of Authorea, a collaborative word processor and repository for scientists. I am also a Research Associate at Harvard University, where I recently completed a Postdoc in Astrophysics. At Harvard, I was also a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society and an affiliate of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. I hold a Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks. I live in Brooklyn, NY. I was born and raised in the small wine-making town of Manduria, in Puglia, Southern Italy.
Twitflick is a multi-modal platform / installation that I developed in 2009 with Sasank Reddy, Lilly Nguyen, Mark Hansen in collaboration with Digital Kitchen. It blends a continuous stream of real-time text tweets from Twitter with related user-uploaded images hosted on Flickr.
Twitflick relies on the expressiveness and narrative nature of tweets and in turn acts as a digital space in which distributed, temporally-authentic personal narratives, in the form of photographs and text, intersect. As such, Twitflick captures the quotidian rhythms of online social exchange and draws attention to the poetic potential of the web.
Unfortunately, the production version of Twitflick is currently offline, but you can check out the following article for more info: Twitflick: visualizing the rhythm and narrative of micro-blogging activity (published in Proceedings of the Digital Arts and Culture Conference 2009)

Twitflick is a multi-modal platform / installation that I developed in 2009 with Sasank Reddy, Lilly Nguyen, Mark Hansen in collaboration with Digital Kitchen. It blends a continuous stream of real-time text tweets from Twitter with related user-uploaded images hosted on Flickr.

Twitflick relies on the expressiveness and narrative nature of tweets and in turn acts as a digital space in which distributed, temporally-authentic personal narratives, in the form of photographs and text, intersect. As such, Twitflick captures the quotidian rhythms of online social exchange and draws attention to the poetic potential of the web.

Unfortunately, the production version of Twitflick is currently offline, but you can check out the following article for more info: Twitflick: visualizing the rhythm and narrative of micro-blogging activity (published in Proceedings of the Digital Arts and Culture Conference 2009)

— 4 years ago