ALBERTO PEPE

I am the co-founder of Authorea, a collaborative word processor and repository for scientists. I am also a Research Associate at Harvard University, where I recently completed a Postdoc in Astrophysics. At Harvard, I was also a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society and an affiliate of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. I hold a Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks. I live in Brooklyn, NY. I was born and raised in the small wine-making town of Manduria, in Puglia, Southern Italy.
Since the Turing test was first proposed by Alan Turing in 1950, the primary goal of artificial intelligence has been predicated on the ability for computers to imitate human behavior. However, the majority of uses for the computer can be said to fall outside the domain of human abilities and it is exactly outside of this domain where computers have demonstrated their greatest contribution to intelligence. Another goal for artificial intelligence is one that is not predicated on human mimicry, but instead, on human amplification. This article - Faith in the Algorithm, Part 1: Beyond the Turing Test - surveys various systems that contribute to the advancement of human and social intelligence.

Since the Turing test was first proposed by Alan Turing in 1950, the primary goal of artificial intelligence has been predicated on the ability for computers to imitate human behavior. However, the majority of uses for the computer can be said to fall outside the domain of human abilities and it is exactly outside of this domain where computers have demonstrated their greatest contribution to intelligence. Another goal for artificial intelligence is one that is not predicated on human mimicry, but instead, on human amplification. This article - Faith in the Algorithm, Part 1: Beyond the Turing Test - surveys various systems that contribute to the advancement of human and social intelligence.

— 5 years ago